Opening Day

Join us for our opening day! Featuring our street parade, opening reception and theatre productions.

Opening Day Street Parade

Date: Thursday, September 26
Time: 6:00pm
Admission: Free

Join youth ensembles, community groups, and entertainers to welcome in another MOJA Festival season. Come and see the joyful celebration that features energetic performances, colorful costumes, and the exciting sounds of marching bands! The parade begins at Marion Square and heads down King Street, turning onto Market Street, and ending at the US Custom House at East Bay and Market Streets.

Art Forms and Theatre Concepts Presents: Miss Dessa

Dates: Thursday, September 26, 8:00 pm; Friday, September 27, 8:00 pm; Saturday, September 28, 4:00 pm; Sunday, September 29, 6:00 pm
Venue: Dock Street Theatre
Address: 135 Church Street
Admission: $35 Adult, Senior/Student $30
PURCHASE TICKETS HERE

“Miss Dessa” is a delightful comedy telling the story of the Warnette family, and the challenges associated with shared inherited property. In “Miss Dessa”, one of the relatives schemes to outwit the relative wielding the power. This powerful and exciting comedy has lots of twists and turns that will have you chuckling out loud.


When I First Remember

Dates: Thursday, September 26; 7:00pm
Thursday, October 3; 7:00pm
Venue: Old Bethel United Methodist Church
Address: 222 Calhoun Street
Admission: $21 Adult; $11 Children under 12
PURCHASE TICKETS HERE


Queen Atterberry of Lady in White Production Company and an ensemble of talented performers blend music, dance, and dialogue to tell the story of the inception of Gullah-Geechee culture, which is unique to the Lowcountry.

Linked

By Colin Quashie

On view August 23 – December 7
Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art
College of Charleston | 161 Calhoun Street
Free admission | Find out more at halsey.cofc.edu

Colin Quashie creates images that tease out underlying stereotypes. Combining historical relics and artifacts with icons from past and present popular culture, Quashie sharply critiques the way people of color are portrayed in modern visual culture. In his latest series, called Linked, Quashie juxtaposes images of well-known Black figures with other representations of artifacts to comment on stereotypes as they exist today.